News

Feb 26, 2017
Category: General
Posted by: cmsadmin

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Sunday April 23rd

Our 2017 Communications Academy theme is:

"Public Safety/Public Service: Supporting Our Communities with Emergency Communications,"

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08:30 Registration Begins

09:00 Welcome and Introductory Remarks

09:30 Keynote -

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17 - Keynote Speaker: Ed Hare, W1RFI, ARRL Lab Manager Rising Noise Levels, Causes, Impact and What Can Be Done

ARRL Laboratory Manager Ed Hare, W1RFI, has been doing RFI work for the League for decades.  When he asks groups of hams if they think that noise levels are rising, the hands go up in the air.  In this keynote speech, Ed will offer some of the reasons for the increased noise levels, explain what can be and is being done about it, and tell us about some of the challenges that hams face in trying to return spectrum closer to its natural state.  A 30-minute slide presentation will be followed by an open-ended Q&A and discussion.

Ed Hare, W1RFI, is employed by ARRL, the National Association for Amateur Radio. After an industry career in product testing, he came to work at ARRL HQ in 1986. He started as ARRL’s "Product Review" test engineer, moved on to becoming ARRL’s "RFI guru" (notice his call!) and he now holds the position of Laboratory Manager. Over the years he has written quite a number of RFI articles, ranging from articles for QST and the "ARRL Handbook" to articles about the practical aspects of RFI that have appeared in professional trade journals. He is also one of the authors of the ARRL "RFI Book" and the author of the ARRL's book on RF exposure, "RF Exposure and You." He is very active holding a seat for Amateur Radio on various industry committees, serving as a voting membership on the IEEE EMC Society Standards Development and Education Committee, the ANSI accredited C63® EMC Committee as Chair of Subcommittee 5 on Immunity, and is the IEEE EMC Society Vice President of Standards, representing ARRL and the interests of Amateur Radio as industry standards are developed. He is a member of the IEEE Standards Association, the IEEE EMC Society and the Power Engineering Society. His personal operating interest is QRP CW, where Ed’s motto is, “Five Watts is a Lot of Power!”  He is presently doing work on HF using 10 milliwatts, reporting 30 states worked, all in the ARRL CW Sweepstakes.

Contact Information:

ARRL, the National Association for Amateur Radio
225 Main St.
Newington, CT 06111
Tel: 860-594-0318
Fax: 860-594-0259
Email: W1RFI@arrl.org
Web: http://www.arrl.org

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Sunday Morning Sessions:  10:45-12:00

18 - A Multi-Jurisdictional Interoperability Project   - Paul Peters, VE7BZ

The Multi-Jurisdictional Radio Interoperability Project or MRIP will create an interoperable radio communication and mutual aid support network that will eventually link all EOC’s on Vancouver Island through the development and implementation of a standardized approach to radio frequency programming within both the amateur and some portions of the commercial spectrum for each local jurisdiction. Phase one of the project is the launch of a common amateur radio code plug that will operate using identical radio technology in each location. Phase two of the project is the establishment and implementation of a commercial fee-for-service linked radio technology to enable inter-EOC communications throughout all locations on Vancouver Island.

Paul Peters, VE7BZ, spent 30 years in the telecommunications industry with a variety of responsibilities in both technical and senior managerial positions. With a background in both computer science and economics, he is a specialist in large project management. Retiring (from the telecom industry) at a very early age, he began a second career with local government on southern Vancouver Island.

In his capacity as the Emergency Telecommunications Coordinator, he manages, maintains and coordinates the daily operation of a large radio network that includes six remote mountain top repeater sites that provide first responder life-line communications for 18 fire departments and approximately 500 responders who response area is just over 1000 square miles.

In addition, Paul is also responsible for the amateur radio based local government Emergency Communications Team or ECT who respond in support of his community-based emergency program.

He is the Canadian Co-Chair for the PNW-CBCG (Pacific Northwest - Cross Border Communications Group) which is a 'think-tank' non-governmental group that is comprised of emergency responders from a number of agencies in southwestern British Columbia and northwestern Washington State.

Paul holds an Advanced level amateur radio licence with two call signs; VE7AVV and VE7BZ.

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19 - Grounding, clearing up the dirt on grounding -  Joe Blaschka, PE.  WA7DJZ    Adcomm Engineering

This presentation is a discussion of grounding for both fixed and portable locations. Options for grounding not only at communications sites and home installations but also talk about grounding and electrical safety at temporary installations as well. It would be a mix of theoretical and practical including the NEC requirements as well.

Joe Blaschka, WA7DJZ, has been in communications engineering for over 40 years and has engineered hundreds of communications systems. He is the principal at ADCOMM Engineering Company.

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20 -Planning an Emergency Broadband Data Network and HamWan  - Mike Hlavaty-LaPosa, K7MHL

Communication and internet access are vital these days, yet these capabilities often fail in disasters. Over the past year, the Redmond ARES Team has been investigating what it would take to build a wireless broadband backup network using 5Ghz and 900MHz radios. This network will enable City of Redmond emergency workers to provide timely and well-coordinated disaster response when typical systems fail. The program name for this network effort is Red.E.Net.

In this presentation, we'll describe what we've learned so far about conducting site surveys, analyzing RF environment issues, doing on-site testing, and creating a high-level network design that is flexible enough to deal with the challenging topology in Redmond. We'll also share our experiences connecting to HamWAN, deciding on what equipment to use, and working closely with our local city and OEM representatives. Finally, we'll give a progress report on the status of our own project.

Mike Hlavaty-LaPosa, K7MHL, is an Amateur Extra and has served as the Redmond ARES Team Leader since 2012. Interested in radio technology and electronics since high school, Mike has been working on IT and communications systems since the early 1980s, specializing in developing, testing and deploying products and systems for packet data and cellular networks for Motorola, AT&T and the military.

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21 - Land navigation: Using map and compass to navigate unfamiliar territory as an Emergency responder, Carl Leon, N7KUW

An introduction to different navigation and coordinate systems you might encounter doing volunteer work, especially emergency response volunteer work.  Imagine if most of the familiar landmarks and street signs disappeared – could you find your way?

Carl Leon, N7KUW, has been an amateur radio operator for over 25 years, and has extensive experience in commercial radio. He supports VHF and UHF radio voice communications for King County Search & Rescue, and is a member of Seattle's Auxiliary Communications Service (ACS).  Carl has completed the FEMA Communications Unit Leader (COML) course and the Department of Homeland Security Communications Unit Technician (COMT) and Auxiliary Communicators (AUXCOM) courses.

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22 - Beginner’s Track #4: But I am Afraid to talk into the Microphone  - Alan Jones, KD7KUS

We have all had mike fright and it can strike beginners and experts alike. This session will help you overcome mike fright by explaining amateur radio etiquette - knowing the procedures will help you build confidence to get on the air. The dos and don'ts of talking over the radio will be demonstrated, and you will have an opportunity to both observe and practice these techniques on the air in a friendly environment.  We’ll go over typical net procedures and how to check in to a net, and how to start a contact on the air with someone you’ve never met.

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B - Lunchtime  12:00 - 13:30 - Networking

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Sunday Afternoon Presentations:  13:30-14:45

23 - FirstNet’s Unique Apps, Functions and Features for Public Safety  - Bill Schrier, Senior Advisor, FirstNet

The First Responder Communications Authority (FirstNet) was created by Congress in 2012, funded with $7 billion from sale of spectrum, and given the mission to build a nationwide LTE cellular communications network for use by responders to public safety incidents and disasters.   First responders will have priority and pre-emption on FirstNet.   Other than those two features, will FirstNet just be another mobile wireless LTE network?   Are there other features, functions and apps which will make FirstNet unique from AT&T, Sprint, T-Mobile and Verizon?    Are there capabilities which only FirstNet will offer, capabilities not available to responders on commercial wireless networks?   Will any of these capabilities potentially improve communications from citizens and amateur emergency communicators with responders?  Bill Schrier, Senior Advisor at the First Responder Network Authority discusses some of the current thinking about such capabilities.

Bill Schrier is senior advisor to the First Responder Network Authority (FirstNet) where he leads efforts to develop apps, products and services needed by public safety responders.

Schrier’s previous experience includes serving as the Chief Information Officer (CIO) for the Seattle Police Department, senior policy advisor in the State of Washington’s Office of the Chief Information Officer (OCIO) and as Chief Technology Officer (CTO) for the City of Seattle.

As CIO for the Seattle Police Department, Schrier oversaw a staff and program to build, operate and maintain technology systems which support this municipal public safety agency of 1350 sworn officers and 2000 total employees.

As CTO for the City of Seattle from 2003 to 2012, Schrier managed a department of 220 professionals and a $59 million budget supporting the technology needs of the municipal government of the City of Seattle.

Schrier lives in West Seattle, holds a Masters of Public Administration (MPA) degree from the University of Washington (Seattle) and a Bachelor of Science (B.S.) in Physics and Math.  Schrier is a retired officer with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.

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24 - Are You Ready to Deploy? Considerations for deploying in austere environments Ken Neafcy, City of Seattle DEM

Providing support to your local EOC is a piece of cake.  However what about when you have to deploy in the middle of nowhere or half way across the state?  This presentation will cover the basics and best practices of out-of-area deployments including base camps.   Attendees will leave with an understanding of what they need to take into consideration when deploying, what to include in a go kit, deployment and safety checklists they can use back in their own jurisdiction.

Ken Neafcy has been with City of Seattle Office of Emergency Management for the past six years. Prior to that, he served for over 12 years with the City of Austin (TX) OEM. While in Texas, he was a member of the Capital Area Incident Management Team (Type 3) where he qualified as a Logistics Section Chief (Type 3) and Plans Section Chief (Type 3). He deployed as part of the team to wildfires in Florida and Louisiana. He also did several in-state deployments for floods, wildfires, and special events.

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25 - RFI Forum    Ed Hare, W1RFI, ARRL Lab Manager

There are two types of hams -- those that have had problems with interference and those that don't get on the air. In this breakout session, ARRL Laboratory Manager Ed Hare, W1RFI, has a slide presentation that talks about RFI from start to finish, followed by a Q&A session where Ed will try to help hams with RFI problems. Ed is a world player in the area of EMC engineering, showing international engineers what hams can get done.

(See Ed's Hare, W1RFI, Bio under Sunday Keynote session at top of page)

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26 - Beginner’s Track #5:  This is Fun! What’s Next?  - Don Marshall, KE7ARH

Now that you've had real on the air experience, we dig deeper into the reason many have chosen to get into amateur radio - emergency communications. This session will explain the basics of EmComm, how emergency nets are run, and the difference between everyday communications and emergency communications. You'll learn how to get involved in EmComm through a local ARES or RACES team, how we serve the various agencies that depend on us, and the basic skills needed for emergency communications. Did you know that public service events are good training for EmComm - they are sometimes called "planned disasters". Finally, you will practice passing simulated EmComm message traffic in the "CommAcademy Emergency Net". Of course, THIS IS A DRILL!

Don Marshall, KE7ARH, is one of the leaders of Bellevue Communications Supports (BCS). BCS is an ARES/RACES organization that serves the Office of Emergency Management in City of Bellevue Fire Department. In 2008 he was awarded the Presidential Volunteer Service Award by the Bellevue City Council for his work in emergency digital communications. Don built a Heathkit GR-81 with his Dad in 1971 and has been working with computers and software for 40 years.

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27 - Exercise Sweeper 2017    Paul Peters, VE7BZ

Exercise Sweeper 2017 (ES2017) is an amateur radio EOC-centric radio linking and connectivity exercise that will involve many local authorities on Vancouver Island, parts of metro-Vancouver as well as some cross-border partners in western Washington State. The training event will take place on May 03, 2017. In addition to local authorities, some Provincial and Federal government resources will also participate in the event. The exercise will address initial findings specifically related to amateur radio communications during the 2016 Exercise Coastal Response event which paralleled Cascadia Rising in Washington State. The two singular training objectives central to ES2017 are: amateur radio needs more opportunity to work with EOC staff and EOC staff need more exposure to the operational capabilities of amateur radio that supports a local authority.

Paul Peters, VE7BZ, spent 30 years in the telecommunications industry with a variety of responsibilities in both technical and senior managerial positions. With a background in both computer science and economics, he is a specialist in large project management. Retiring (from the telecom industry) at a very early age, he began a second career with local government on southern Vancouver Island.

In his capacity as the Emergency Telecommunications Coordinator, he manages, maintains and coordinates the daily operation of a large radio network that includes six remote mountain top repeater sites that provide first responder life-line communications for 18 fire departments and approximately 500 responders who response area is just over 1000 square miles.

In addition, Paul is also responsible for the amateur radio based local government Emergency Communications Team or ECT who respond in support of his community-based emergency program. He is the Canadian Co-Chair for the PNW-CBCG (Pacific Northwest - Cross Border Communications Group) which is a 'think-tank' non-governmental group that is comprised of emergency responders from a number of agencies in southwestern British Columbia and northwestern Washington State.

Paul holds an Advanced level amateur radio licence with two call signs; VE7AVV and VE7BZ

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Sunday Afternoon Presentations:  15:00 – 16:30

28 - Amateur Radio Major Incident Response Strategy – Lee Chambers, KI7SS

After "The Big One", WHAT EXACTLY will we amateur radio operators and ARES/RACES teams do, assuming we've survived?  How will we organize ourselves, how will we move the vast quantities of information we will get from our shelters and site surveys to incident commanders and responders?  How  will we assist the thousands of people separated from loved ones?   This discussion addresses the shortcomings our repeater-based infrastructure creates. faces these issues squarely, offers some strategies that will make the tasks manageable, and acknowledges several challenges needing resolution.

Lee Chambers, KI7SS, is a member of the Thurston County ARES, a seven-time President of The Olympia Amateur Radio Society, an Advanced Toastmaster, the Washington State ARRL State Government Liaison, and a retired computer WAN specialist.  He lives in Olympia with his wife Nancy and enjoys utilizing amateur radio to manage road rallies, parades, Boy Scout night-hikes, and similar events.   He can often be found on twenty or forty meters, usually with the antennas aimed toward Australia or New Zealand.

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29 - Renewable and Alternative Power Sources for Ham Radio  - Ralph Javins, N7KGA

Will include a presentation of solar and wind power sources with display samples, and discussion of some other recent developments in alternative power sources, such as fuel cells.  Wiring and power monitoring systems.  Other considerations also, such as: How much electrical power does it really take to operate a ham radio station?  When does the NFPA NEC apply to you?

Ralph Javins, N7KGA was first licensed in 1957, now an Amateur Extra, operated W/K, KH6, VE7, VY1, ZL1, and some others.  Main interests have been on HF with both phone and CW, along with activity on VHF on phone and digital modes.  Equipment used includes commercially available radios and antennas, along with radio kits and some home brewed radios and antennas.  Radios have been both vacuum tube and solid state.

Alternative energy history:  Ralph built his first solar panel in February of 1962 while at the US Naval Research Laboratory.  Has been operating a portable 100 Watt HF ham radio station off solar and wind power for 20 years.  Also backpack portable 5 Watt HF radio station with solar power.  One of the additional capabilities for the Winnebago motor home is a solar power battery recharging system for 100 Watt HF radio operation which can be supplemented with wind power when parked.  Have provided "hands-on" presentations on solar and wind power for ham radio at the CommAcademy and other organizations. Ralph’s public service and other activities beginning in 1981 to the present time, include the Western Washington Medical Services Team, ARES, Yakima and King County SAR, USCG Auxiliary, SATERN, ANRC, and some others.

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30 - Map Your Neighborhood – Jan Bromberg, KE7DXY

This presentation will provide an overview of the Washington State sponsored program, Map Your Neighborhood, followed by a one-hour Train-the-Trainer workshop.

Jan Bromberg, KE7DXY, is founded the Sammamish, WA Citizen Corps in 2003, and has been a certified CERT instructor and program manager since 2004. She is also a Community Preparedness Educator with the American Red Cross (since 2006) and is a General Class Amateur Radio Operator.

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31 - Beginner’s Track #6: I Get It Now! Where Do I Go from Here? -  Carl Leon, N7KUW

A discussion of primarily radio and radio-related equipment to consider for moving forward in amateur radio, and especially public service communications.  What equipment do you need or want to become an accomplished, productive EmComm operator?  (Toys, toys, tools)

Carl Leon, N7KUW, has been an amateur radio operator for over 25 years, and has extensive experience in commercial radio. He supports VHF and UHF radio voice communications for King County Search & Rescue, and is a member of Seattle's Auxiliary Communications Service (ACS).  Carl has completed the FEMA Communications Unit Leader (COML) course and the Department of Homeland Security Communications Unit Technician (COMT) and Auxiliary Communicators (AUXCOM) courses.

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[This page was last updated on 03/13/2017 at 13:26 hrs]

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